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Evaluation

Evaluation and analysis provide essential evidence for HHS to understand how its programs work, for whom, and under what circumstances. HHS builds evidence through evaluation and analysis in order to inform decisions in budget, legislative, regulatory, strategic planning, program, and policy arenas. Given the breadth of work supported by HHS, many evaluations and analyses are conducted each year. These efforts range in scope, scale, design, and methodology, but all aim to understand how the effect of programs and policies and how they can be improved. 

Across HHS, evaluation comes in many forms, including: 

  • Program evaluations using the most rigorous designs appropriate; 
  • Capacity-building initiatives to improve administrative data collection, accessibility, and use for management; 
  • Exploratory and preliminary quantitative and qualitative analysis to build evidence; 
  • Pilots and demonstrations; and 
  • Statistical analysis of factors related to health and human services programs and policies. 

ASPE coordinates the evaluation community by regularly convening the HHS Evaluation & Evidence Policy Council, which builds capacity by sharing best practices and promising new approaches across HHS. 

Reports

Displaying 311 - 320 of 320. 10 per page. Page 32.

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A Pilot Study fo the Adequacy of Post-Hospital Community Care for the Elderly: Final Report

September 12, 1989
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Review of State Quality Assurance Programs for Home Care: Final Report

March 31, 1989
  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Long-Term Care Service Use: Longitudinal and Predictive Models Final Report

February 28, 1989
This study describes community and institutional service use patterns over a five year period (1982-1987), based on secondary analyses of longitudinal data for over 4,000 Massachusetts elderly. Emphasis was placed on community service use of persons judged to be at high risk of institutional placement.

National Conference on Home Care Quality: Issues and Accountability--Volume I Proceedings

December 31, 1988
To better understand the actual nature of quality problems in home care and the difficulties that home care agencies and state officials face in assuring quality of care, DALTCP sponsored a practitioners conference on quality assurance in home care. The conference included researchers and federal and state regulatory officials and emphasized the experience of practitioners in the field.

The Evaluation of the National Long-Term Care Demonstration

March 31, 1988
Peter Kemper, Randall S. Brown, George J. Carcagno, Robert A. Applebaum, Jon B. Christianson, Walter Corson, Shari Miller Dunstan, Thomas Grannemann, Margaret Harrigan, Nancy Holden, Barbara R.

Analysis of Channeling Project Costs

April 30, 1986
This report examines a small but key aspect of Channeling — the costs of operating the demonstration itself. The ten sites incurred costs of $23 million as they prepared for and later provided case management and long-term care services to clients between September 1980 and June 1984.

Analysis of the Benefits and Costs of Channeling

April 30, 1986
The principal finding of this report is that Channeling led to an increase in total costs for clients, including costs for medical and long-term care services and costs for shelter, food and other daily living expenses.

Channeling Effects on the Quality of Clients' Lives

March 31, 1986
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

A Guide to Memorandum of Understanding Negotiation and Development

December 31, 1981
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services