The Skill Sets and Health Care Needs of Released Offenders. Table 2. The Relationship Between Skill Sets and Post-Release Success/Failure

12/01/2001

Table 2. The Relationship Between Skill Sets and Post-Release Success/Failure

Re-Entry SkillsPredictors of Recidivism (Bold Indicates Dynamic Risk Predictors Others are Static Predictors)
Academic SkillsLack of Education or Employment Skills (67 studies, average r = .18) Intellectual Functioning (32 studies, average r = .07)
Vocational Skills/ Correctional WorkLack of Education or Employment Skills (67 studies, average r = .18)
Interpersonal Skills (Parenting, Normative Relationships)Conflicts with Family and Significant Others (28 studies, average r = .15) Parent or Sibling Criminality (35 studies, average r = .12) Family Rearing Practices (31 studies, average r = .15) Separation from Parents, Broken Home (41 studies, average r = .10)
Leisure Time SkillsIdentification/ Close relationship with Criminal Peers (27 studies, average r = .18)
Cognitive SkillsAttitudes Supportive of a Criminal Lifestyle (67 studies, average r = .18) Anti-social Personality (63 studies, average r = .18) Identification/ Close relationship with Criminal Peers (27 studies, average r = .18) Adult Criminal History and Prison Misconduct (64 studies, average r = .18) History of Antisocial Behavior Prior to Adulthood (119 studies, average r = .13)
Spirituality/Ethical Skills 
Daily Living Skills 
Wellness Skills 
Mental Health SkillsAnxiety, Depression, Neuroticism, Psychiatric Symptomatology (66 studies, average r = .05) Substance Abuse (60 studies, average r = .14)
Accountability SkillsAttitudes Supportive of a Criminal Lifestyle (67 studies, average r = .18) Anti-social Personality (63 studies, average r = .18) Adult Criminal History and Prison Misconduct (64 studies, average r = .18) History of Antisocial Behavior Prior to Adulthood (119 studies, average r = .13)