Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities. Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities : Table 31

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Title:Relationship between Community Environments and Resident Changes in Adaptive Behavior: A Path Model
Authors:Richard K. Eyman, Gail Carter Demaine, and Tzuen-Jen Lei
Published:American Journal of Mental Deficiency
Date:1979 (Vol. 83, No. 4)
Method:245 DD individuals, residents of 87 family care homes and 11 board-and-care homes formed the sample. Program Analysis of Service Systems (PASS-3) had been administered between 1976 and 1977 by trained raters; the PASS-3 is an evaluation done by teams of trained raters who arrive at final scores which represent a consensus of opinion on each of the 50 items. The purpose of the study was to characterize what type of resident appeared to benefit from a “normalized” environment. All subjects were rated on the ABS as well.
Summary of Findings:Older and mildly retarded individuals improved far more than did younger or more severely retarded residents. The path analysis provides an estimate of the strength of the relationship between the resident characteristics, PASS facility ratings, and change in adaptive behavior defined in the path model. Significant correlations were found between all of the independent variables (age, IQ, initial adaptive behavior domain scores and PASS-3 factor scores) in one set and 3 measures of improvement in adaptive behavior in the other set. One the Personal Self-Sufficiency factor, age level of retardation, and the initial score in this domain were highly related to average annual gain on this domain. Residents with higher IQs shoed more positive change than residents with lower IQs regardless of age. Age was not related to positive change in Domain 2: Community Self-Sufficiency was independent of IQ. Age, IQ, and initial score, however, were all significantly related to improvement on Personal-Social Responsibility; with older, less retarded residents and those with lower initial scores demonstrating most improvement.