Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities. Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities : Table 29

12/01/1988

: Table 29

Re:Personal/facility affecting adaptive behavior
Title:Predicting Adaptive Functioning of Mentally Retarded Persons in Community Settings
Authors:John T. Hull and Joy C. Thompson
Published:American Journal of Mental Deficiency
Date:1980 (Vol. 85, No. 3, 253-261)
Method:The study examined the extent to which individual, residential, and community characteristics were related to the functioning of persons with mental retardation in a variety of residential facilities. 369 retarded persons from 144 special residential facilities in Manitoba formed the sample. The Adaptive Functioning Index (AFI) was used to collect adaptive behavior data in the domains of Personal Routines, Community Awareness, and Social Maturity. A modified version of the ABS was also used. Other information regarding age, sex, IQ, length and number of times institutionalized, characteristics of residences, staff attitudes, physical disabilities of residents, etc. was collected. Four regression analyses, one for each of the individual domains of the AFI and for the total score were done.
Summary of Findings:Clients residing in urban facilities with access to effective transportation systems had better skills; indicating that the nature of the community is an important factor. Individual characteristics of each resident such as inappropriate aggression, etc. were found to influence behavior and adaptation. The appropriateness of staff-resident interactions was a strong contributory factor to social maturity, and successful functioning in the community. Those placed in smaller communities tended to demonstrate slightly more social maturity on the AFI than residents placed in large communities. While community awareness was more a function of intellectual capacity than Personal Routines, the contribution of environmental normalization variables to the latter was higher. Other individual factors such as age, behavioral problems, and the extent to which residents were satisfied with their current residence were significantly related to various aspects of adaptive functioning.