Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities. Report from the Working Group on Improving Public Policies and Programs Affecting Persons with Mental Retardation and Other Developmental Disabilities : Table 28

12/01/1988

: Table 28

Re:Developmental changes following an institution training program
Title:A Follow-up of Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded Children After Short-Term Institutionalization
Authors:Normal R. Ellis, George E. Bostick, Sheila A. Moore, and Janine J. Taylor
Published:American Journal on Mental Deficiency
Date:February 1981
Method:100 children with severe and profound mental retardation were admitted to a public residential facility for the purposes of providing self-help skill training for 6-12 months and then returning them home. 50% of the children had no language skills, the remaining 50% had mixed language skills. Reanalysis of the clinical records, training, and progress reports, staff interviews was done and these data were converted to scores on four scales of the AAMD’s ABS. Home visits, interviews with parents of each child, and an administration of the ABS during the home visit were conducted. The interviewer later rated various aspects of the family-SES, educational levels of the parents, etc.
Summary of Findings:Early intent of the parents regarding institutionalization influenced the long-term care plan despite the training program. Fewer of the children whose parents supported home care returned to institutions after the program (4% to 37.5%). The training program made home adjustment easier for parents who supported home care. Those who preferred long-term institutionalization also noted the progress wrought by the training program, but also admitted experiencing a relief from the burden of child care. Slight gains were seen in the areas on the ABS through training. Slight improvements in maladaptive behavior were seen after deinstitutionalization. Reinstitutionalized children exhibited lower skill levels than children who receive home care; they also showed a decline in skill levels (language development and self care) upon returning to the institution. Gains in toileting, dining, and social skills are negligible. Both groups of children showed an increase in maladaptive behavior; the increase was not statistically greater for either group.